News
10/13/2017
After the release of 40 young Lesser Kestrels from the adaptation aviary in the Centre, in the last days of the “Lesser Kestrel Recovery” LIFE11 NAT/BG/360 project this summer, it is time to take care of their homes, so, when spring comes, they will return with their families, we hope.
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10/13/2017
The bird was found by active citizens on Kuklensko shose road, at the outskirts of Plovdiv in Monday. 
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10/12/2017
We were interested, and believe that you were too, in tracking the migratory route of the female Lesser Kestrel, called 5N, after the ring she carries.
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10/02/2017
39 participants send 106 photographs in total, and “Green Balkans” decided to award all of them first price.
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10/02/2017
As you may very well know, the five-year-long “Lesser Kestrel Recovery” LIFE 11 NAT/BG/360 project had come to an end. It has the purpose of returning the Lesser Kestrel in the skies over Bulgaria.
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Lesser Kestrel
Lesser Kestrel (Falco naumanni, Fleischer, 1818) is a small falcon species that is a useful ally of man in combating pests in agricultural landscapes. Once considered among the most abundant birds of prey in Europe, today, due to agriculture intensification, farmland abandonment, loss of nesting sites and intensive pesticide application it has an uncertain future.
Lesser Kestrel is strongly attached to agro-environmental landscapes, showing high preferences towards extensively managed wheat crops and extensively grazed or otherwise maintained pastures. The species is an essentially insectivorous, opportunist feeder, capable of exploiting a wide range of terrestrial and aerial prey.
Lesser Kestrels are often nesting in urban areas, as they provide nesting sites and reduced nest predation and are usually surrounded by agricultural fields or open uncultivated grasslands, securing food sources. The species is therefore highly dependent on human activity not only for foraging areas but also in terms of available nesting sites.
In the past, the Lesser Kestrel was widely spread in Bulgaria, nesting “everywhere” in the mid-19th century. At present, there are no Lesser Kestrel breeding pairs confirmed in Bulgaria.